Posts

, , , , ,

Tech note, everyone – wearable technology is on the move!

We have often associated wearable technology with the fitness industry. Companies such as FitBit have produced spectacular results in this field, harnessing the ability to track and manage anything from distance run to calories burned over a certain period of time.
However, wearable tech is now leaving the wellbeing scene behind and advancing on to a period of world domination.
Advanced wearable biometrics can be used as a form of authentication for a number of things.
NEC corporation has recently adopted the software to identify people placed on ear readings – something previously unprecedented in the industry.
“The system enables biometric authentication via the otoacoustic emission, a sound made by the inner ear when the cochlea is stimulated, arising from the vibration of hair cells,” reports mobileidworld.
“According to a statement from NEC, its earbud device’s “otoacoustic authentication technology… recognizes the characteristics of a user’s ear”, suggesting that the emission is used to map the shape of the inner ear, which is presumably unique to the individual.”
The advancement of contactless, wearable technology is a clear indication of the continued progress of our industry.
The technical possibilities are endless – and NEC confirms this with future plans to commercialise the technology soon.
NEC plans to offer “services that combine individual authentication, indoor positioning, acoustic AR (augmented reality), vital sensing and other technologies”, according to NEC Business Development Division General Manager Tomonori Kumagai.
The contactless revolution has only just begun – don’t get left behind.

, , , ,

Contactless payment coming to Birmingham buses and trams

The way we pay for public transport will become a lot more straight forward.

Catching the bus in the West Midlands is about to get a lot easier.

National Express West Midlands has announced plans to fit their buses with technology to allow contactless payment.

Their 1,500 buses in the area with take payments from bank cards, smartphones, smart watches, cash and Swift cards.

Peter Coates, managing director of National Express West Midlands, said: “We know our customers want the choice of using contactless when they travel.

“Only a month ago, we introduced it on the Midland Metro and already 7% of passengers buying a ticket on board are using contactless.

“So, as part of our pledge to the West Midlands Bus Alliance to get more people travelling by bus, we are investing in contactless because it makes journeys quicker and easier for passengers.”

The new technology will appear first on buses in Coventry by the end of the year before coming to Birmingham and the rest of the West Midlands over the following two years.

It is predicted to speed up bus journeys because passengers will spend less time buying a ticket at bus stops.

A report into the effects of congestion on bus passengers recently said: “If London-style cashless buses with contactless payment and smart ticketing could be extended to the rest of the UK, bus journey times could be improved by up to 10% by halving dwell time at bus stops.

Soon you will be able to pay your bus fare with your debit card.

“In urban conditions, dwell time makes up between 25% and 33% of total journey time. The big five bus operators in the UK have set a target to introduce contactless bus transactions by 2022.

“They should do everything possible to accelerate this, and it is realistic for them to achieve this goal in the large conurbations within three years.”

 


Beardsworth, L. (2016) When will contactless payment be available on Birmingham buses?Available at: http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/contactless-payment-coming-birmingham-buses-11609505 (Accessed: 14 July 2016).

, , , , , ,

Apple Pay is coming to the web – but there’s a catch

Apple Pay will soon be available on in browsers on macOS and iOS, but payments will still have to be authenticated on an iPhone.

Following months of rumours, Apple has confirmed it is launching Apple Pay on the web.

The feature was unveiled at the annual Worldwide Developer Conference and will let you pay for goods through Safari on macOS and iOS. Payments will still need to be authenticated using a fingerprint-enabled iPhone or the Apple Watch.

When customers are browsing on supported websites – such as Crate and Barrel and lululemon – an Apple Pay button will appear. It will work in a similar way to Apple Pay on apps.

Previously, to use Apple Pay iPhone users could store their card details into the contactless system and use NFC to tap and pay for goods in participating stores. Alternatively, they could use Apple Pay to buy items on selected iPhone apps.

Today’s announcement expands this to the web. People shopping on a website on a Mac, or via Safari on their phones, will get a notification on their iPhone to confirm the transaction, which this is done using TouchID.

 

Apple Pay will be limited to £20 until September, when payments up to £30 will be allowed

Apple Pay will be limited to £20 until September, when payments up to £30 will be allowed

This means users won’t have to manually enter credit card information on individual websites or store them online when buying goods because the payment – and security – is routed through the Apple Pay system.

The new features are due to start rolling out to the UK and US countries “soon” and WIRED has contacted Apple to get more information and details of supporting websites.

Apple Pay launched in the UK last year and brought the contactless payment system to stores including Boots, Costa, Lidl, Marks & Spencer and Nando’s.

More than 250,000 shops across the UK now accept Apple Pay, with Transport for London also supporting the payment method on its network. The UK was the second country to get Apple Pay after the service launched in the USA in October 2014.

 


Woollaston, V. (2016) Apple pay is coming to the web – but there’s a catch. Available at: http://www.wired.co.uk/article/apple-pay-web (Accessed: 12 July 2016).